football team – Tom Cosgrave http://tomcosgrave.com/ Sun, 13 Mar 2022 14:15:04 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://tomcosgrave.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T165924.844-150x150.png football team – Tom Cosgrave http://tomcosgrave.com/ 32 32 DCHS Soccer Talent Allie Wilbur signs with Waynesburg University https://tomcosgrave.com/dchs-soccer-talent-allie-wilbur-signs-with-waynesburg-university/ Sun, 13 Mar 2022 12:09:37 +0000 https://tomcosgrave.com/dchs-soccer-talent-allie-wilbur-signs-with-waynesburg-university/ March 13, 2022By: Dwayne Page Allie Wilbur, a gifted senior Lady Tiger football player, signed a letter of intent Friday with Waynesburg University to play college football for the Lady Yellow Jackets next season after graduating in May. Waynesburg University is located in Waynesburg, Pennsylvania. Members of his family, his coach and other players joined […]]]>

March 13, 2022
By: Dwayne Page

Allie Wilbur, a gifted senior Lady Tiger football player, signed a letter of intent Friday with Waynesburg University to play college football for the Lady Yellow Jackets next season after graduating in May.

Waynesburg University is located in Waynesburg, Pennsylvania.

Members of his family, his coach and other players joined Wilbur in the signing.

In addition to continuing his football career, Wilbur plans to study forensic investigation at Waynesburg.

“I will be majoring in forensic investigation and pursuing a career in crime scene investigation,” Wilbur said. “I chose Waynesburg because I felt it was the best opportunity because I could get the forensic training I wanted, and I could also play football at the next level, which was a big goal. C It’s a really good opportunity and I believe I can grow there,” she said.

During his high school years, Wilbur anchored the Lady Tiger football team on the left wing.

“I have really enjoyed playing for Coach K and the Lady Tigers for the past four years. They have been the best years of my life and I have made a lot of close friends. I have played left wing. The wing left is outside the left side of the field, and I pretty much moved the ball up and down that sideline and put it in midfield for the striker and created goal-scoring opportunities,” Wilbur said.

Allie said she developed a love for football at an early age and has been playing the sport since she was little. As a high school football star on the women’s team, Allie followed in the footsteps of her father Andrew Wilbur who also played football at DCHS for Coach K on the men’s team.

“Allie was a good captain. She’s a quiet leader and doesn’t talk much, but she leads by example,” DCHS football coach Dylan Kleparek said. “This year she’s been a real leader for us on the team, not just on the pitch but in the way she’s acted, and, by the way, the other girls have followed her in that attitude. Allie has scored several goals. She played on the left wing for all four years and was a hard worker on the pitch. Allie also had plenty of assists where she put the ball in the box and gave others people the opportunity to score. She’s got a strong left leg and she’s a strong player,” said coach K.

The fact that Allie was also Coach K’s first second generation player also made his coaching experience that bit more special.

“I coached her dad (Andrew) in the boys program and seeing Allie doing the girls program too was really awesome. Andrew was on the first two teams I had. After 20 years I’ve been around long enough to see the next generation and that’s pretty exciting,” he said.

Waynesburg University is a private university located in Waynesburg, Pennsylvania. It was established in 1850 and offers undergraduate and graduate programs in over 70 academic concentrations. The university has over 2,500 students, including about 1,800 undergraduates. Waynesburg University is a member of the Presidents’ Athletic Conference (PAC).

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COUCH CORNER: Arvin High women’s soccer team had another great year | The Delano Disc https://tomcosgrave.com/couch-corner-arvin-high-womens-soccer-team-had-another-great-year-the-delano-disc/ Sat, 12 Mar 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://tomcosgrave.com/couch-corner-arvin-high-womens-soccer-team-had-another-great-year-the-delano-disc/ I would like to tell you about a special group of young female athletes from Arvin High School. You may not remember this but before COVID the Arvin High School Lady Bears football team won their first ever valley championship in 2019. Well this year they had another great year . The Lady Bears hadn’t […]]]>

I would like to tell you about a special group of young female athletes from Arvin High School. You may not remember this but before COVID the Arvin High School Lady Bears football team won their first ever valley championship in 2019. Well this year they had another great year .

The Lady Bears hadn’t won a valley championship in all of Arvin High School’s history, so Coach Tello’s 2019 championship was quite the feat. As you may know, high school athletics has been deeply impacted by COVID-19. It’s great to see that post-COVID the Arvin High School Lady Bears football team is back in the spotlight. Recently, Coach Tello’s new Lady Bear varsity football team won against all of their competing South Sequoia League opponents. Yes, the Arvin High School Lady Bears football team went 12-0 in the NSSL League competition.

The women’s soccer program has changed drastically thanks to the coaching of Luis Tello and his family. He took over the program in 2015 when their overall record was 5-15. It was during this season that Coach Tello realized things had to change for the school and the girls. He merged his club team Bakersfield Stars FC with the Arvin football program. It took time, but the coaching staff saw results. In the 2016-17 season, Coach Tello took the women’s soccer program to its first Valley Finals appearance, where they lost on penalties. In this difficult defeat, the coach and the team knew that to achieve their goal, they would only have to work a little harder. And they did.

In the 2018-19 season, they attended the Hoover Tournament in Fresno and played against Tulare Union, a Division II team. Arvin being a Division VI side there should have been a difference but there wasn’t as they tied Tulare Union. Seeing what the girls were capable of, Coach Tello knew the team had great things in store.

That year, they raced through league play with an 11-1 record, securing the league championship title for the first time in the history of Arvin’s women’s soccer program. That season, they even managed to beat a private school in Fresno for the D-VI CIF-CS Championship, winning their first regional playoff game against Venice High School, then losing the semi-final against South El Monte, l team that ended up winning the state championship. From then on, the Lady Bears won the Valley in D-VI for two consecutive years totaling three championships.

These girls come from working families, the players who work mainly in the fields and then go to train. The school does not have the luxury of having players come to train. The girls do not take private lessons and have not played club football all their lives. For many girls, they touch a soccer ball for the first time in high school during a tryout.

As you might think, they’re underrated and get little media coverage, but with all this success, their opponents and all of Kern County should watch out, because they’re making a statement: they’re here to win.

With three consecutive valley titles and four tournament appearances, they are now ranked higher and the competition is more intense. They also learn to succeed in life. Many girls have gone to college and continue their studies while playing.

In 2022, the Lady Bears felt they could win it all this season, but it ended early. They played Dinuba and had a total of 30 shots for that game, but it was just one of those games where the ball didn’t bounce. Every player since 2018-19 has contributed to the team’s current situation. This legacy gives the team the confidence they needed to know that a Valley Championship is something achievable.

The seniors this season, Ashley Ochoa, Noemi Velez, Denise Ortiz, Citlali Sanchez and Diana Reyes, have played a huge role in the team’s success. They were the heart of the team, but with this new found confidence, you will see the young girls rise to power and carry on the legacy. Expect to hear more about this outstanding program in the future.

If you have any questions about this or any other District 4 topic, please don’t hesitate to contact us at district4@kerncounty.com or 661-868-3680. Have a safe week and congratulations to the Arvin Lady Bears!

David Couch represents Kern County’s 4th District.

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Cougar Soccer opens season with 5-1 win over Whale Branch https://tomcosgrave.com/cougar-soccer-opens-season-with-5-1-win-over-whale-branch/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 22:00:00 +0000 https://tomcosgrave.com/cougar-soccer-opens-season-with-5-1-win-over-whale-branch/ By CINDY CROSBY The Colleton County Cougar football team opened the regular season with a 5-1 win over non-conference opponent Whale Branch High School on March 1 at home. In the first Region VII-AAAA game of the season, the Cougars were shut out 8-0 by May River High School on March 4. In the win […]]]>

By CINDY CROSBY

The Colleton County Cougar football team opened the regular season with a 5-1 win over non-conference opponent Whale Branch High School on March 1 at home. In the first Region VII-AAAA game of the season, the Cougars were shut out 8-0 by May River High School on March 4.

In the win over Whale Branch High School, Jeremiah Howell had two goals and an assist and Westin Palmer had a goal and an assist. Avery Floresca and Chandler McMillan each added a goal and Evan Stroble was credited with an assist.

In the loss to No. 3-ranked May River High School, the Cougars trailed 7-0 at halftime.

“After giving up two quick goals in the first three minutes, the team refused to attack, which played into the way May River played,” coach Brian Reid said. “We wanted to play defensively so as not to give up the first goals and shorten the game to half time, but instead we refused to advance and collapsed towards goal creating all sorts of problems for us. themselves and chances for May River.

“We’re a young team, and it was the first time we were challenged from the opening whistle. We just didn’t respond by losing our defensive and offensive form,” Reid said.

“Azion White played phenomenally at goalkeeper in the May River game,” he said. “He had at least 10 amazing saves and finished with 20 saves on the night. After the game, the May River coach acknowledged his game, saying he was fantastic, and we should have a great season if he keeps playing like that every night.

During the preseason, the Cougars faced Wade Hampton High School (loss, 3-2) and Colleton Prep Academy (victory, 5-1).

“Our scrimmage against Wade Hampton was a home and away game with us trailing 1-0 at halftime,” coach Brian Reid said. “We took a 2-1 lead in the second half but conceded a late goal from a corner following a play error by the defense and the goalkeeper. It was a great learning experience. We had some good moments and some not so good ones, but you could say it was our first scrum. We’re going to have to play more like a team.

“In our scrum against Colleton Prep, we scored all of our goals in the second half,” Reid said. “The first half didn’t go as planned because we failed to manage our business. We played much better in the second half managing our attack and communicating. We are young with two seniors, a few juniors and sophomores, and a large number of freshmen.

Colleton County has a 1-1 overall record and an 0-1 start in regional play. They were due to travel to Lucy Beckham High School on March 8 and host Hilton Head High School on March 11.

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Former Penn-Trafford Championship team assistant named new Latrobe football coach https://tomcosgrave.com/former-penn-trafford-championship-team-assistant-named-new-latrobe-football-coach/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 02:58:18 +0000 https://tomcosgrave.com/former-penn-trafford-championship-team-assistant-named-new-latrobe-football-coach/ Ronald Prady has had two recent state championship seasons at Penn-Trafford — as an assistant football coach last fall and as an assistant softball coach in 2019. Wildcats fans hope he continues this winning trend as the new coach of Latrobe’s football program. The school board on Tuesday named Prady to lead Latrobe’s coaching staff. […]]]>

Ronald Prady has had two recent state championship seasons at Penn-Trafford — as an assistant football coach last fall and as an assistant softball coach in 2019.

Wildcats fans hope he continues this winning trend as the new coach of Latrobe’s football program.

The school board on Tuesday named Prady to lead Latrobe’s coaching staff. He succeeds Jason Marucco, who resigned after eight seasons with a 20-56 record with two WPIAL Class 5A playoff appearances.

Prady has been teaching junior high math at Greater Latrobe since 2006. His additional coaching salary has yet to be determined.

A native and resident of Penn Township and a 1990 Penn-Trafford graduate, Prady coached his children at PT: Jake in football and Allie, who was on the championship softball team.

“It was really hard to leave Penn-Trafford,” he said, “but my kids have grown up. It’s a great opportunity for me to coach where I teach. It’s a different challenge . I’m really looking forward to it.”

His wife, Liz, is also a faculty member at Latrobe, teaching middle school English.

“As much as I love the Penn-Trafford community, so much do I love these (Latrobe) kids,” Prady said.

Prady has crossed paths with many Wildcats players in his class and on the opposite side of the court. He plans to meet them all as a team on Wednesday.

“We have great athletes here, great kids,” he said. “I look forward to working with them. I’ll get to know them a little better as I go along.

Another priority for Prady will be to complete his coaching staff.

Given the time constraints, he said: “Coaches are getting harder and harder to find now. You’re not doing it for the money, that’s for sure. You do it for the love of children and the love of play.”

Prady expressed his respect for the hard work of Marucco and his team. But, he said, “I just think we need some cultural changes,” based on the elements of success he’s acquired in his 25 years of coaching.

“You can’t win without being tough, and you can’t be tough physically without being tough mentally,” he said, adding, “You have to play good defence.”

Prady has been on the Penn-Trafford football team for a decade, having served as an assistant at Franklin Regional and under Latrobe’s Pat Murray in 2006 and 2007.

Since then, he says, “offences have evolved. People started spreading the ball a lot.

Recently, Prady coached linebackers at Penn-Trafford, but he was an offensive line coach at Franklin Regional.

“I’ve been lucky enough to coach both sides of football,” he said. “You learn the whole game that way.”

Prady began his teaching and coaching career with a brief stint in the San Diego area. Then he coached at several schools in Virginia, serving as the head football coach at Caroline High School in 2001-04.

Jeff Himler is an editor of the Tribune-Review. You can contact Jeff at 724-836-6622, jhimler@triblive.com or via Twitter .

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‘Hard not to imagine the worst.’ SLU football player calls his father every day in Ukraine | SLU Billikens https://tomcosgrave.com/hard-not-to-imagine-the-worst-slu-football-player-calls-his-father-every-day-in-ukraine-slu-billikens/ Sat, 05 Mar 2022 01:15:00 +0000 https://tomcosgrave.com/hard-not-to-imagine-the-worst-slu-football-player-calls-his-father-every-day-in-ukraine-slu-billikens/ The first time Alex Shterenberg called his father in Ukraine after the bombs started falling, the St. Louis University student could hear the sound of air raid sirens blaring through the walls of the his father’s apartment in Kiev. Henry Shterenberg, Alex’s father, was in his apartment near the city center. He was supposed to […]]]>

The first time Alex Shterenberg called his father in Ukraine after the bombs started falling, the St. Louis University student could hear the sound of air raid sirens blaring through the walls of the his father’s apartment in Kiev.

Henry Shterenberg, Alex’s father, was in his apartment near the city center. He was supposed to be in Poland for a business meeting but was forced to turn back when he came across a military roadblock.

That’s how Henry learned the war had started—watching tanks go by on the road to Belarus. It was the first information he was able to share with his son, who plays football at St. Louis University, when they spoke that day.

They now talk morning and evening, and Alex helps his father in an initiative to inspire Ukrainian students to tell their stories and rally them to what they hope will ultimately be the rebuilding of the country.

“I’m staying in touch as much as I can to make sure he’s alive,” Alex said. “When I don’t hear from him for a few hours, it’s hard not to imagine the worst.

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“For the first time in my life, I feel like I belong in Ukraine. I have the greatest passion of my life that I will carry with me forever. The first thing I want to do after the end is to go back and immerse myself in that culture.

Alex was born in the United States after his parents and grandparents emigrated from Ukraine after the dissolution of the Soviet Union. He transferred to SLU from Michigan State last year to complete his football eligibility.






St. Louis defenseman Alex Shterenberg (23) clears a ball as LIU midfielder Robert Winkler (14) pressures him during a game between Long Island University and St. Louis in the 2nd round of the NCAA Men’s Soccer Tournament in St. Louis, Mo on Sunday, November 21, 2021. Photo by David Carson, dcarson@post-dispatch.com


David Carson


Henry, 50, is a businessman who has focused on attracting investors to Ukraine, a job pending. He is now focused on raising awareness, as the city where he grew up and played national youth football under the old Soviet system is bombarded intermittently within sight of his fifth-floor balcony.

“It’s hard to be safe because the TV tower exploded about a 15 minute walk from me,” he said. “You hear huge sounds and sirens. I drove for the first time (Thursday) to get some food, and the town is completely unrecognizable. I never imagined it would take a week to do so much damage.

While Alex will be playing a spring football game on Saturday for SLU, his dad just hopes he’s safe enough to take a walk in a park next to his apartment building.

Henry lives next to the US Embassy west of the city center, a place he thinks might be safer than some, as he doubts Russian President Vladimir Putin might bomb him and create even more tension.

Alex was raised with his sister, Dasha, in Boston to Russian-speaking parents and is fluent in the language. He only visited Kyiv once but was surrounded by the region’s culture all his life and never saw Russia as an adversary.







SLU football player Alex Shterenberg with his sister, Dasha, and father, Henry

Alex Shterenberg (left) experiences the war in Ukraine through reports from his father, who lives in Kyiv, as the two work together on initiatives to engage Ukrainian students for the country’s future. Photo courtesy of the family


He had heard stories of day trips relatives had taken by train to Moscow. He sees Ukraine and Russia as sister nations. He enjoyed many massive family dinners featuring dishes from the region, and he speaks Russian on his “compulsory” weekly or bi-weekly calls with his grandparents. His bond with the country is strong.

“When the war started, I was completely devastated because I sat on the couch watching the news for two days,” he said. “Now it destroys me. I can’t sit like this and watch anymore without knowing how long it’s going to last.

So he is spending time working with his father on a new organization Henry has named United Students of Ukraine, which he hopes will grow into a movement. Henry formed the organization before the war began with the goal of having students across the country develop websites for the communities there.

Alex helps edit and post student videos to social media sites including Instagram. The hope now is to mobilize young people who will help rebuild the country.

“We were just starting to build the business model to see how it can work,” Henry said Friday morning from Kyiv. “We had to adapt, and now part of what we do is for students around the world to help change Ukraine’s image and show the world what it has to offer.”

Alex started six games last season for the SLU football team, which was ranked in the top 10 nationally and reached the Elite Eight in the NCAA Tournament. He will return for the 2022 season, having already completed a degree in marketing, and is now aiming for a master’s degree in leadership and organizational development.

He started playing football with his father and other Ukrainian and Russian residents in Boston. During his visit to Kiev, he went with his uncle to see the Olympic Stadium. Now the pitch where his father played in his youth is destroyed.

“I’m here while kids younger than me are getting AK-47s and fighting in the streets,” Alex said. “So I’m going to do everything I can now by raising awareness.”

Henry Shterenberg likes to think he’s safe, but what he’s seen and heard isn’t reassuring. A Holocaust museum a short walk from his home was damaged and a bridge destroyed. An area near the zoo between his apartment and the city center came under fire. A residential area just west of his home was hit on Friday.

The days are mostly spent indoors with his toy terrier, Napoleon. He traveled to the nearest bomb shelters to familiarize himself with the space but stayed in his apartment to work on projects; he has also been interviewed by journalists around the world. If necessary, he says, he will take up arms.

When Henry arrived in the United States, he had virtually nothing. At first, Henry worked in a meat-packing deli, munching on slices when he was hungry, Alex said.

When he returned to Ukraine five years ago, Henry’s life was very different. Henry became president of the World Trade Center in Kiev. He recently worked on developing his country, including the country’s first “green city” in Hostomel, where there was extensive damage.

One day, Alex and Henry hope to join forces in Ukraine to help create a better future for the country.

“It’s stressful and conflicted right now because life here is so normal,” Alex said of St. Louis. “People go about their daily lives, and in my head, my dad is stuck in the middle of a war.”


Missouri lawmakers speak out against Russian invasion of Ukraine

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'A hero to us': Ukrainian-American St. Louis adoption advocate dies during invasion

Serge Zevlever of St. Louis helped hundreds of Ukrainian children with medical needs to be adopted by American families before he was killed during the Russian invasion of Kiev.

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WVU Men’s Soccer Announces Spring Slate | WDVM25 and DCW50 https://tomcosgrave.com/wvu-mens-soccer-announces-spring-slate-wdvm25-and-dcw50/ Fri, 25 Feb 2022 15:17:40 +0000 https://tomcosgrave.com/wvu-mens-soccer-announces-spring-slate-wdvm25-and-dcw50/ MORGANTOWN, WV — Highlighted by four games at Dick Dlesk Football Stadium, the 2022 spring schedule for the West Virginia University men’s football team has been announced. The Mountaineers are set to play in six exhibition games in total, with collegiate, international and professional competition. WVU will host Wright State on Saturday, March 26 in […]]]>

MORGANTOWN, WV — Highlighted by four games at Dick Dlesk Football Stadium, the 2022 spring schedule for the West Virginia University men’s football team has been announced.

The Mountaineers are set to play in six exhibition games in total, with collegiate, international and professional competition. WVU will host Wright State on Saturday, March 26 in Morgantown, as well as VCU on Saturday, April 2. The team’s other two home games this spring include a date with Canadian club Athlete Institute FC on Thursday April 14 and Maryland on Saturday April 23.

All four home games are free for all fans.

Spring competition begins Saturday, March 5, when the Mountaineers travel to Steel City to take on the Pittsburgh RIverhounds SC of USL Championship. From there, WVU plays back-to-back games at home against Wright State and VCU, before hitting the road again for a trip to the Navy on Saturday, April 9 in Annapolis, Maryland.

Spring ends with Athlete Institute FC and Maryland home games.

“We look forward to the challenges ahead with this spring’s game schedule,” WVU coach Dan Stratford said. “We spent the first two months of the semester working for the Riverhounds game which is a great reward for the hard work of the guys and will be a great test for them.

“After that, we get one game a week against fierce competition to help us get into a good routine, try new methods and explore different options. The team understands that our work at this time can impact our success this fall, and we have our eyes firmly set on this award.

The Mountaineers went 12-3-6 in 2021 and reached the NCAA Quarterfinals for the first time since 1981. The team finished No. 8 in the United Soccer Coaches rankings, good for their best finish in the survey history.

WVU was seeded No. 11 in the 2021 NCAA Tournament, marking the first time it had a national seed in the event since 2007. The club also finished 8-0-3 at home, good for his first unbeaten campaign at the Dick Dlesk Soccer Stadium since 2007.

All dates, times and locations are subject to change.

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Callaway Boys’ Soccer Team claim more wins than all of last season in just nine games – Reuters Sports News https://tomcosgrave.com/callaway-boys-soccer-team-claim-more-wins-than-all-of-last-season-in-just-nine-games-reuters-sports-news/ Fri, 25 Feb 2022 04:18:13 +0000 https://tomcosgrave.com/callaway-boys-soccer-team-claim-more-wins-than-all-of-last-season-in-just-nine-games-reuters-sports-news/ The Mercy of the Callaway Boys’ Football Team reigned over Bowdon 12-2 on Thursday night. Callaway went 7-0-2 this season and they’ve now won more games than all of last season. It was a short game for the Cavaliers as they reached the 10-goal mercy rule in 68and minutes of play. “We came out focused, […]]]>

The Mercy of the Callaway Boys’ Football Team reigned over Bowdon 12-2 on Thursday night. Callaway went 7-0-2 this season and they’ve now won more games than all of last season. It was a short game for the Cavaliers as they reached the 10-goal mercy rule in 68and minutes of play.

“We came out focused, controlled the ball and scored some quick goals,” said head coach Mike Petite.

Jostin Raymundo was the star for the Cavaliers with a hat trick in the first half, including a goal from the penalty spot. He also contributed with two assists.

Greyson Batchelor and Connor Davis each scored two goals apiece. Jurnee Jordan, Brett Belton, Eli Jones, Angel Velasquez and Nitler Recinos all got on the scoresheet with a goal. Recinos is the starting keeper, but had to play outside the box as the scoreline moved away from Bowdon.

Jones also had an assist with Nelson Herrera with two.

The Cavaliers conceded two goals in the game, both coming on field trades as head coach Mike Petite gave everyone time.

Bowdon’s keeper was out of control the whole game and could have been sent off – he conceded two penalties but only received one caution. The Cavaliers scored from the first penalty but were unable to complete the second.

Despite the score in favor of the Cavaliers, all was not rosy and sunny.

“Our team defends to be better,” Petite said. “We conceded two goals because we made mistakes not only at the back, but we made mistakes up front. Our defense starts with our forwards.

The Cavaliers left the field with a victory for the Callaway faithful but were playing for something much bigger than that tonight.

“This is our seventh annual cancer awareness game,” Petite said. “The guys all had pink ribbon on their wrists with someone’s name in it. Personally, my wife and my mother-in-law were affected by this at the same time, so there is obviously a personal connection for me and all the boys.

Both Callaway teams sported pink jerseys they can keep forever.

The regional kick Cavaliers play on Tuesday March 1 against Bremen.

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Football announces 2022 spring schedule https://tomcosgrave.com/football-announces-2022-spring-schedule/ Thu, 24 Feb 2022 21:49:19 +0000 https://tomcosgrave.com/football-announces-2022-spring-schedule/ birch fuller February 24, 2022 FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. – The Razorback football team set their spring game slate on Thursday afternoon, head coach Colby Hale announced. Arkansas will host two of its four games at Razorback Field, hosting the TCU Horned Frogs and Oklahoma Sooners in Fayetteville. The schedule begins Saturday, March 5, when the Hogs […]]]>


FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. – The Razorback football team set their spring game slate on Thursday afternoon, head coach Colby Hale announced. Arkansas will host two of its four games at Razorback Field, hosting the TCU Horned Frogs and Oklahoma Sooners in Fayetteville.

The schedule begins Saturday, March 5, when the Hogs travel to face TCU in Fort Worth, Texas. The Horned Frogs are coming off a 19-win season and their second consecutive Sweet Sixteen appearance. They finished second in the Big 12 conference standings. The game time has not been set.

TCU will visit Fayetteville 29 days later, playing Arkansas on Sunday, April 3 at Razorback Field. The first kick is set for 1:00 p.m. CT and the match will be free to the public.

The Razorbacks then head to St. Louis, Missouri for a game against the Iowa Hawkeyes on Saturday, April 9. Iowa is coming off a 12-6-2 season. The two teams last met in the spring of 2019, also in the St. Louis area where Arkansas won the game 2-0. Junior Anna Podojil scored one of the goals.

The Hogs will host Oklahoma for the final game on the spring roster, scheduled for 11:00 a.m. CT on Saturday, April 23 at Razorback Field. The Sooners last visited Fayetteville in 2019, where they escaped with a 1-0 victory in double overtime. The game will be closed to the public.

Spring schedule
at TCU – Saturday, March 5 at TBD
TCU – Sunday, April 3 at 1 p.m. CT
Iowa – Saturday, April 9 at TBD (in St. Louis)
Oklahoma – Saturday, April 23 at 11 a.m. CT (Closed to the public)

Listen to Coach Hale

Each schedule does spring and their spring game schedule is a little different. For us, we are committed to being the best program in the country. To do this, you have to play the best competition you can find. We like this schedule and believe we will be better off late spring than early. That’s the point.

Arkansas is coming off the most successful season in school history, winning the program’s best 19 games and making its first Elite 8 appearance. The Hogs also won their third straight regular-season title in the SEC and advanced to their sixth consecutive SEC Tournament Finals.

For more Arkansas Soccer news, follow @RazorbackSoccer on Twitter.

]]> Norfolk-born Lauren Hemp plays for her sister as she returns to Norwich https://tomcosgrave.com/norfolk-born-lauren-hemp-plays-for-her-sister-as-she-returns-to-norwich/ Fri, 18 Feb 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://tomcosgrave.com/norfolk-born-lauren-hemp-plays-for-her-sister-as-she-returns-to-norwich/ DONCASTER, ENGLAND – NOVEMBER 30: Lauren Hemp of England poses with their match ball after scoring a … [+] hat-trick after the FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023 Qualifying Group D match between England and Latvia at Keepmoat Stadium on November 30, 2021 in Doncaster, United Kingdom. (Photo by Lynne Cameron – The FA/The FA via […]]]>

At 21, Lauren Hemp is heading into her first major tournament with the England women’s football team with the world at her feet. The dynamic left-winger is considered one of the stars of the game, but on Sunday she will play at Carrow Road in Norwich, the stadium she grew up watching the game at.

In the new Arnold Clark Cup, a four-team tournament also involving Olympic champions Canada and Germany, England will face Spain at Carrow Road, the home ground of men’s Premier League team Norwich City. The ground gave young Hemp her first live experience of top-flight football, a game she initially showed little interest in.

“To be honest, it was my dad and sister who had a subscription,” she tells me. “They used to go every week and watch Norwich City. I always used to stay at home with my mum. It was at a time when I wasn’t really interested in football but i think it was as soon as my sister started playing, i wanted to be like her so i joined in. we always had it on the radio if we weren’t there to watch the game, we were big supporters, I always tried to go there whenever I could.

Like many female gamers, Hemp’s first role models in the game were male. “I really looked up to Wes Hoolahan and James Maddison, who I also loved before he left. There are some fantastic players who have come through Norwich. I’ve always supported them. It’s great to go to the games every time I can. I grew up going to Carrow Road. It inspired me to want to be like them when I was older.

It was older sister Amy who sparked the Hemps’ interest in the game, but emulating her wasn’t always a concern for young Lauren who danced on the sidelines when her parents went to see Amy play for the local team. “I was just there doing my own thing while my mum and dad watched over my sister. It was only when I was playing in the back yard, in the garden of my grandma and grandma’s house. -father they said ‘why not try?’. Dad took me to my local base team and a tryout there. The rest is history, I guess.

While Lauren went to fulfill her parents’ dreams of representing their country at senior international level, Amy’s career was derailed by two cruciate ligament injuries which forced her to give up playing. “I think she was more of a goalscorer than I will ever be,” admits the young Hemp. “She was a striker in her own right. She was a great player. Unfortunately, she got injured and couldn’t continue playing, so part of me does that for her too because I know that she would have loved to continue playing. She I also attended a few camps in England and did that before I started going to camps. I have her full support behind me and she still comes to games whenever “She can and has been supporting me from her home. It’s great to have a supportive family around me.”

The predominantly rural English county of Norfolk is the fifth largest in the country, but it is not renowned for producing talented football players. Norwich-born Danny Mills, who always featured for England in the 2002 Men’s World Cup, is one of the few from Norfolk to represent his country. Born in August 2000, Hemp hails from the small market town of North Walsham, famous for its motorcycle museum and the young footballer who in 2020 was voted into the IFFHS u20 women’s world team of the year and named by the body European leader UEFA as one of the ten most promising footballers on the continent.

Pursuing a professional career forced Hemp to live away from Norfolk for over five years, but she still retains an affection for her hometown. “There the market is really nice. Every Thursday they have a market and I used to go there with my grandmother. To be honest, it’s a great little town. Obviously I grew up there, I did my primary and secondary education there like well. I love it. I always walk around town with my mom whenever I’m home. It’s awesome just thinking about it.

Growing up away from the traditional heart of English football, young Hemp couldn’t envision a professional future in the game. “To be honest, growing up I never really thought of football as a career, I always thought of as a hobby. It wasn’t until I was older that I thought it was actually possible. I had to move for me to do that.”

At just 16, she left Norwich City Academy to join Bristol City in Women’s Super League 2. “I moved to Bristol and went to university there. They had a great university academy. We had so much talent at Norwich but there just wasn’t an elite women’s football club I could go to I needed to get away from home to do it They gave me a fantastic start to my footballing career. Obviously having that center of excellence and also being able to train with the boys, the elite boys in Norwich. It was great for me, it really helped me on my journey to become a professional athlete.

On the other side of the country, Hemp couldn’t have gotten much further from Norfolk in England, she admits to feeling homesick. “I remember when I played for Norwich when I was younger and we would go on tour and travel around the country, I was really upset that I was away from home and my family. It was only when I “I actually moved to Bristol that was real. I think it helped me a lot with my independence. It’s definitely come by leaps and bounds because you don’t normally see 16 year olds years leaving home. So for me, that was a huge thing at such a young age. It’s been part of my journey and it’s helped me become the player and the person that I am today. It was always hard to get home, it was at best a five hour drive to get back and see my family, those are the kind of sacrifices i made to be where i am today.

Within two years, Hemp had been voted Professional Footballers’ Association Young Player of the Year and secured a move to Manchester City. This weekend she will return home to Norfolk hailed as a local hero with many familiar faces in the crowd. “I think one of the stalls is full to be honest with all my friends and family!” she tells me. “I’m just trying to get as many tickets as possible. A lot of them have come home to tell me they’ll be there to support me. It’s great to have a lot of my old friends back. school, my mum’s friends, my sister’s friends, obviously all my family Yeah I just have a bunch of people coming so I can’t wait to get back to Carrow Road on Sunday and show Norfolk how much quality that exists in women’s football.

As Carrow Road has not staged a senior women’s international game since 2006, Hemp acknowledges that this will also be the first time many of her teammates have traveled to the area. “It’s not often people come to Norwich. It will be great to show them the area because it’s a fantastic city. I loved growing up there. I wouldn’t change that for the world, I I always like to come home, so it will be a great experience for everyone. I think I will definitely be the tour guide!”

Having made her senior international debut in 2019 shortly after the last Women’s World Cup, the UEFA Women’s Euro in England this summer will be Hemp’s first chance to feature for England in a major league. However, her first experience of a senior tournament came last year when she represented Great Britain at the Tokyo Olympics. The team were eliminated in the quarter-finals by Australia, but Hemp ended the competition as the tournament’s most-offending player, receiving thirteen illegal challenges in three matches.

She admits it’s something a creative player like her has to deal with. “Obviously I love taking people one and sometimes it gets me foul. I take it in my stride. I like running against players because that’s one of my strengths. I enjoy every game of the game and I don’t mind getting a little dirty on the floor too from time to time. I love playing football and if that happens sometimes, that’s what happens.

England’s opponents Spain enter the Arnold Clark Cup on a 16-game winning streak, a run that began with victory over the Lionesses in the She Believes Cup in March 2020. Hemp did not play in that match but came up against the core of the Spanish squad when FC Barcelona knocked Manchester City out of the Women’s Champions League last season.

She is full of admiration for their way of playing. “I think they’re definitely the best possession-based team I’ve seen. It’s going to be a great experience for me and the rest of the squad. These are the kind of games you want to play. We’re going to go there -down and obviously do our best and make sure we try to win. We want to be in the best possible position for the Euros, that’s the start of that. Obviously Spain are a top team, what they’ll bring a lot of possession-based football, a lot of attacking threats, but hopefully we can match that and be one step ahead of them.”

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Wolverines football reflects a strong community | Sports https://tomcosgrave.com/wolverines-football-reflects-a-strong-community-sports/ Sat, 12 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://tomcosgrave.com/wolverines-football-reflects-a-strong-community-sports/ Few high school programs can turn a one-season, one-win scenario into a playoff staple in just one year. However, the boys’ football team at Tolleson Union High School had the personnel to change the narrative. In 2003, the Wolverines were unable to attract any footballers to Tolleson, especially when a handful of children opted to […]]]>

Few high school programs can turn a one-season, one-win scenario into a playoff staple in just one year.

However, the boys’ football team at Tolleson Union High School had the personnel to change the narrative.

In 2003, the Wolverines were unable to attract any footballers to Tolleson, especially when a handful of children opted to play on other, more successful teams. Former coach/current manager Felipe Mandurraga accepted the challenge and spearheaded the rebuild.

While Mandurraga led the program, he quickly changed the varsity team structure and began a string of playoff appearances.

“(Mandurraga) brought a different feel to the team. It wasn’t just about a bunch of kids going out and playing with a ball,” said former player/current college coach Rodrigo Lopez. “It was more structured, and it was more based on what each of us brought to the team. He brought out the best in each player.

The core group of players laid the foundation for the school to retain other players in the region and gradually build a cohesive program.

After seeing gradual progress and making the state playoffs, the Wolverines won the state championship in 2010.

Mandurraga credited the consistent drive tree as one of the pillars of the team’s success.

Once Mandurraga stepped down, his senior assistant took over. This led to another chief assistant taking over and the cycle continued into today’s team.

“I think it’s just the consistent message, this consistent practice that they had in the program,” Mandurraga said. “But the basis behind it all is the mentality that this is Wolverine football: we’re going to win.”

Lopez rose through the ranks in various coaching positions, which allowed him to lead the best football players in Tolleson Union.

The team’s proud tradition continued with numerous semi-finals and second-place finishes. Lopez carries on those memories and experiences in the new batch of Wolverines.

Initially, Lopez was not looking for a coaching job. On the contrary, the post was looking for him. After hearing from a former teammate and friend that Mandurraga was looking for a coach for the newly formed freshman team and was interested, he didn’t give it much thought. Tolleson Union attracted so many new players that a third team was needed so more kids could play.

After accepting the offer to coach the freshman team in 2007, Lopez returned to Tolleson Union and began his coaching career. Being able to expand on the project started by Mandurraga, Lopez is grateful to start at the freshman team level.

Mandurraga recalled a pivotal moment when Lopez was his assistant. Halfway through the season, Lopez argued that a player was better suited in midfield than in defence. Mandurraga pushed back but ultimately took Lopez’s advice.

“I remember that argument very well. It was in the coach’s office, and it was good. It was a fight and it made us better,” Mandurraga said. “So I tell people all the time that you have to surround yourself with good people and listen to them, and I’m glad I did because it made us a better team.”

That year, the team won the state championship.

Wolverine soccer is connected to the community. Lopez is just one example of a player returning to school after graduating.

“We have a lot of families that stay in Tolleson, and a lot of their kids come to play for us,” Lopez said. “They come up to me and they say hello because I used to play with them or go to school with them. They are happy that their children are in the football team, because it goes back several generations.

Going forward, Lopez hopes to reclaim the regional title that recently eluded the Wolverines. They’re also aiming to get past the first round of the playoffs, which has been a roadblock for the team for the past few years.

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